Read full details here…

A social media friend of this blog, Ballet Master Jonathon Levy has written an interesting article on LinkedIn in which he explores “Concepts about Training – realities and absurdities”

What is accepted is not always efficient. So how do we get ourselves, and others, to higher levels of efficiency without placing them, or ourselves, under more pressure than it is worth to achieve?

This article touches on aspects of dancer motivation and is relevant to this blog’s  focus. You can find the article here. If you have comments that are relevant to this blog, feel free to comment here as well as on Jonathon’s article.

Hi, I am Mike and I am pursuing anthropology as an interest in my retirement. In September 2011 I started this blog and have been calling it a research blog. The purpose was to engage with professional ballet dancers and ballet companies to get a feel for developing a useful research question and potentially find contacts to make proposals to for research fieldwork before enrolling in a research degree. With the passing of time I have discovered a lot more about ballet dancers but have also come to the realisation that doing a research degree at my age is just not going to happen. As a result, my blog has become largely inactive. One of the problems I have wrestled with is the fact that many people seem to read the blog but very few comment. I have invited guest posters from the field of dance who have authored for me with some small success. I am now in the process of looking at how this blog may look going forward; how to engage with its intended audience; and how to find motivation to write more and relevant posts.

cheers… Mike

Catherine Tully (see link below) has asked me to promote a new resource for dancers. I am happy to post this information.

Who are we?

Nichelle Suzanne – from Dance Advantage

Catherine Tully – from 4dancers

Lauren Warnecke — from ArtIntercepts

Maria Hanley – from Maria’s Movers

Tiffany Kadani Braniff – from Dancing Branflake

Here’s the link to the purchase page: http://www.danceadvantage.net/start-a-dance-blog/

And some info about the resource:

We are dancers who started dance blogging when there were no examples to look to. We learned things the hard way. We persevered through writing ruts and technical blunders and have significantly grown our readership, our web presence, and our connections.

Getting a blog, writing stuff, and figuring it all out as you go along like we did takes a lot of time. We know you don’t have time to waste.

So let us give you what you need to get started right now…

We want to help you make decisions about your blog without all the trial and error. So we’ve written a guide to starting your dance blog.

UntitledWe’ll tell you all about…

  • Things you need to know to set up your dance blog quickly.
  • Writing better content
  • Engaging readers on and off the site
  • Getting discovered using social media and SEO basics
  • Taking those next big steps like monetization and traffic analysis

We wish we’d had this when we were starting out.

There’s really nothing to lose.

Five experienced dance bloggers will walk you through all of those first blogging questions and frustrations for just $7.75.

Even if you already have a dance blog, or have started… and stopped… and started a blog in the past, you will learn something new from this guide.

So get it and get your dance blog moving today!

Guest post by Judith Lynne Hanna, Ph.D.

Judith Lynne Hanna, Ph.D. is affiliated with the University of Maryland. Hanna’s doctorate in anthropology at Columbia University focused on dance. She has been a dance critic and written many books and articles on dance published in numerous countries where she has given guest lectures and courses.  See www.judithhanna.com for more information.

I am excited to have just learned that in December, Rowman & Littlefield will publish my new book, Dancing to Learn: The Brain’s Cognition, Emotion, and Movement and so I’m sharing the news with you.

This book evolved because I believe everyone can benefit from a new paradigm of dance for young and old alike that is grounded in the new brain sciences and integrated with knowledge in the arts, humanities, and social sciences. Dancing to Learn explains that dance is nonverbal language with similar places and education processes in the brain as verbal language, thus a powerful means of expression.  Dance is physical exercise that sparks new brain cells (neurogenesis) and neural plasticity, the brain’s amazing ability to change throughout life—I’m dancingflamenco, belly dance, jazz, and salsa!).  Moreover, dance is a means to help us cope with stress that can motivate or interfere with learning. We acquire knowledge and develop cognitively because dance bulks up the brain and, consequently, dance as an art, recreational, educational, and or therapeutic form is a good investment in the brain. The “brain that dances” is changed by it.

You may read the description, reviews, and contents here Judith Hanna Dancing to Learn Book Release

Here is an interesting look into the long day of a ballet dancer at The Australian Ballet (@TheAusBallet). Their love of dancing and performing is clearly behind their motivation. However, how does this “love” feel in the mind and bodies of the dancer?



Sensory Anthropology Meets Neuroanthropology.

2013 in review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2013 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

A New York City subway train holds 1,200 people. This blog was viewed about 4,300 times in 2013. If it were a NYC subway train, it would take about 4 trips to carry that many people.

Click here to see the complete report.

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